Endnotes

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1 An earlier version of this work titled “Juxtaposing Causal Mapping and Survey

Techniques to Characterize Expertise” was presented at the Academy of Management

Conference, Seattle, WA, August 2003.

2 The II symbol is used to distinguish the survey driven construct from the interview

driven construct.

3 Gray cells indicate common connections or lack of connections for interview and

survey data. Black cells indicate that a construct does not have a causal linkage

with itself.

4 Shaded area indicates common concepts/constructs for interview and survey data.

5 Instrument available upon request from first author.

Appendix

Interview Guide

1. When a friend asks you “What is object-oriented development?” what do you say?

2. What are the main ideas that define object-oriented development?

3. What is the easiest concept to learn?

4. What is the most difficult concept to master?

5. How is that different from procedural development?

6. Think of a time when you have been given a requirements document (for example,

say to develop an accounting system) and asked to produce an object-oriented

solution. What was the first thing you did? How did you proceed from there?

7. What problems do you think experienced procedural developers have as they learn

object-oriented development?

8. How could the transition from procedural to object-oriented development be made

easier?

9. How do you know if an object-oriented developer is an expert?