How Coaches Navigate Turbulent Organizations

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 

Let’s start with an all-too-familiar story. Sarah had done a spectacular

job coaching three insurance company executives. In the six

months she had been working with them, each had made a shift to

a more authentic and powerful leadership style that was more compatible

with the culture of their company than their previous styles.

Each client was complimentary to Sarah and deeply appreciated her

contributions to their development. Sarah debriefed the HR VP on

these successes and was looking forward to building on this success

to coach more executives with the company. The HR VP said that

he would call when an opportunity arose. The call never came. Sarah

was a great coach, but she was not a consultant. Let’s explore what

it means to be a coach and a consultant and what Sarah could have

done differently to leverage both roles and expand her business

opportunities.