Being a Coach, Being a Consultant

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 

Being a coach and being a consultant are very different roles, and

both are required in order for a coaching initiative to be successful.

Initiative is the operative word here. A person who is in the role of

a coach works on an individual level with a client or series of clients.

For this person to also wear the hat of a consultant takes the focus

to an organization level (Table 10.1). Working at the organization

level opens up new opportunities and responsibilities. The

consultant must ensure that there is strong senior leader sponsorship

for the coaching initiative. Very often, and especially initially,

sponsors need to be educated about what coaching can offer and

how it must be supported. Sponsors and other senior leaders must

have a firm grasp on how coaching will ultimately contribute to

achieving the company strategy. Coaching may be the “right thing

to do,” but few leaders will sign up for sponsoring a coaching initiative

unless this initiative is anchored in achieving business results.

Another important focus of consulting with business leaders to

deploy a successful coaching initiative is the organizational context

in which coaching operates. How well is coaching integrated with

the competency model in use in the organization? The coaching initiative

must be perceived as a natural outgrowth of the company’s

learning strategy or HR strategy. Chapter 8 explored how to make

sure that coaching is integrated with other people-related strategies.

The consultant then partners with the leaders of learning, leadership,

HR, and others to shape their perceptions of how coaching

contributes to achieving these people-related strategies.

Ultimately, the value of a coaching initiative is viewed by how it

closes a performance gap. What performance levels are required in

the future? What is the current level of performance? and How will

coaching close this gap? It isn’t enough that coaching be viewed as

Table 10.1 Contrasts Between Coach and Consultant

Coach Consultant

Individual Organization

Client Sponsor

Competencies Capabilities

Development Needs Company Strategy

Personality Culture

Motivation Power

Personal Values Stated Values

Content Context

a more effective or less costly alternative to other leadership development

efforts.Whereas the coach is concerned with how coaching

will improve the individual client’s leadership skills, the consultant

is concerned with building the business case for how coaching is an

indispensable tool for building strategic capability and closing performance

gaps. Let’s rewind our story with Sarah to see what she

could have done differently.