Describe Expected Areas of Performance Improvement

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When coaching is treated as a strategic initiative, the outcomes of

coaching are expected to impact business results. Coaching becomes

an investment with an expected return on this investment. An

1Anderson (2003); Campbell and Stanley (1963); Phillips (1997).

important aspect of this return is monetary in nature. A key contribution

of the evaluation strategy is to specifically show how

coaching will be expected to impact organization performance. By

presenting expectations for performance improvement in the evaluation

strategy, it becomes clear to everyone involved in the coaching

initiative what outcomes are expected. Sponsors of coaching also

gain early buy-in to coaching and understand better what to expect

from it. The original coaching proposal at OptiCom was devoid of

these considerations. Performance improvement was not even on

Jacqui’s radar screen. It’s no wonder, then, that the sponsors and

leaders of the coaching initiative were left scratching their heads

about what business value was gained from the coaching pilot—and

what future gains would come from full deployment.