Managing the Perception of Value

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This analysis cleared the air for John, whose entire lens for evaluating

the success of coaching was the right-hand column of Table 1.1.

John heard so many stories and testimonials from satisfied coaching

clients that suggested coaching success. Coaching clients

reported increased satisfaction, improved productivity, and improved

problem solving. When John compared what was delivered

(e.g., the right-hand column) versus what leaders expected (e.g.,

the left-hand column), he understood why leaders had mixed feelings

about coaching. Coaching, for all its virtues, was not meeting

the leaders’ expectations, and as such, was not perceived as being

valuable. This analysis also suggested to John how to increase the

value—and the perceived value—of coaching. Better integrating

coaching within the leadership supply process would address three

of those areas that leaders value most: retention, promotions, and

diversity. For example, coaching could be targeted to emerging

leaders from diverse backgrounds to accelerate their opportunities

for promotion. This example illustrates how coaching can meet the

individual needs of the leaders being coached as well as the needs of

the business.