Evaluating Application and Impact

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Several months had elapsed since Jacqui shared the results of the

reaction and learning evaluation with the advisory board. All in all,

the senior leadership was very supportive of the coaching initiative

and questions were being raised about whether to extend coaching

to other groups in the company. This begged the question about

what value had been generated so far. With the coaching initiative

having been completed for about two months, it was time to

conduct the second piece of the evaluation: application and impact.

Demonstrating the ROI of Coaching 219

Thirty coaching clients from the entire group that was coached

were selected to participate in this next phase of the evaluation. The

evaluator, Michael, scheduled a time to meet with, or in some cases

talk with, the coaching clients. Twenty-six of the 30 were available

(87% response rate) for the interview. Throughout these 30-minute

conversations,Michael followed Interview Guide B (see Figure 12.2)

to capture intangible and monetary value.When all of the interviews

were complete, Michael grouped and organized the data. Let’s look

at how Michael conducted the interview for one respondent and

then see how all of the data were organized and evaluated.

Figure 12. 5 shows how an ROI interview was conducted with one

respondent. The individual ROI was calculated for illustrative purposes.

In the actual case study, the ROI was determined only for the

entire coaching initiative. That means that all of the data for all

respondents are grouped and used for the ROI calculations.

The respondent whose data are captured in Figure 12.5 was a

leader of a sales team. As suggested by the answers to Question 1,

before coaching, the business situation had become somewhat dicey.

The team was not meeting its goals and most salespeople were not

achieving their quotas. The leader complained that the salespeople

were not focused and motivated, while team members cited the

leader’s inability to articulate direction as the primary cause of the

poor performance. The coach helped the leader get past the emotional

baggage and provide the team with a more structured

approach to evaluate sales opportunities.

This approach produced immediate results in terms of increasing

the productivity of the sales team and increasing sales (according to

items checked in Question 2). Each of these sources of value was

explored in greater detail, as outlined in Question 3. So, for example,

following the logic of letter code B, or team productivity, the respondent

estimated that at least one hour per week was saved by each of

10 salespeople and that this productivity gain directly resulted from

coaching. Given a compensation rate of $75 per hour, this translated

to $750 per week. This amount was not taken at face value; rather,

this value of $750 was discounted by two factors: (1) estimating the

Figure 12.5 Example of Interview Guide B Completion for a Coaching Client at

OptiCom.