Group Surveys

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 

Written surveys try to accomplish much of what the interview

does, yet at a lower price point. These surveys contain all of the right

questions (we will get to what these questions are later on in this

chapter), although there is no opportunity within the survey itself

for follow-up questions or probing of any kind. On the plus side,

automated survey research tools allow scores, or even hundreds of

respondents to provide data, and have the data analyzed in a matter

of a couple of weeks. Surveys offer a standardized approach to data

collection and therefore lend themselves to questions with response

categories or scales. Analyzing standardized questions reveals

summary statements to be made about the entire group of people

who were coached. The surveys used in the previous chapter at

OptiCom provided many examples of these kinds of questions. In

this case study, we found for example that 86% of the respondents

were improving their coaching skills as a result of their coaching (cf.

Figure 12.4). This was very valuable to learn and contributed to

understanding the value that the coaching was creating for the

clients and the organization. In the next section of this chapter we

will examine a survey that explores the application of coaching in

detail.