Value and Individual Values

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The four-quadrant Leading with Insight model presented in the first

section was developed based on the experiences of both authors.

Each quadrant was illustrated with stories about coaching relationships

that really hit home about how the coach and client can

achieve extraordinary success. This model has further proven its

value in capturing and organizing the data from all of the coaching

relationships that the authors have formally evaluated. In this final

chapter,we look at all of the coaching relationships in aggregate. The

Leading with Insight model provides a platform for this analysis and

enables us to gain greater insights into the collective value that

coaching provides to the business in addition to the value individuals

gain from coaching. This cuts to the heart of Coaching That

Counts: how coaching creates value for both the individual and

the organization. Let’s examine this value nexus and see how

coaching creates a win-win situation for both the individual and the

organization.

A review of the data reveals six key findings:

1. The perceived effectiveness of coaching increased with the

length of the coaching relationship.

2. Less than half of coaching relationships evolved beyond

Quadrant 2.

3. The impact of coaching on the business increased as coaching

relationships evolved.

251

4. Monetary benefits produced from coaching increased as

coaching relationships evolved.

5. Seventy percent of the monetary value was associated with

quadrants 3 and 4.

6. As coaching relationships progressed through the quadrants,

the average monetary benefit produced by each client

increased.

Each of these findings is examined in detail in the following sections.

Finding 1: The Perceived Effectiveness

of Coaching Increased with the Length of

the Coaching Relationship

Coaching clients were asked after their coaching relationship had

concluded how effective they believed their coaching to be. Figure

14.1 displays the hours of time that people were coached and how

252 Coaching That Counts

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

Not Effective 14 6 2

Somewhat Eff. 40 25 17

Very Effective 46 69 81

6 hours 12 hours 18 hours

Figure 14.1 Percentage of Respondents Citing the Effectiveness of Coaching

According to the Hours They Spent Being Coached.

effective they believed their coaching to be. This figure clearly shows

that those who were coached the longest (e.g., 18 or more hours)

rated coaching the highest: 81 percent rated coaching as very effective,

17 percent as somewhat effective, and only 2 percent as not

effective. On the other hand, those who were coached the shortest

amount of time, (e.g., up to 6 hours) rated coaching as less effective:

46 percent rated coaching as very effective, 40 percent as somewhat

effective, and 14 percent rated coaching as not effective.

One implication of the data is that coaching relationships should

not be arbitrarily cut short. Coaching relationships should be

allowed to run their course regardless of how long this may take.

Some organizations, for example, will begin coaching with a pilot

program and set a time limit of, say, six months. Coaches and clients

will be surveyed or interviewed to evaluate the relative success of the

pilot. These data suggest that, by setting this kind of time limit, these

organizations may be limiting the effectiveness of the coaching and

having the pilots underperform. A more effective approach would

seem to be to let the coaching relationships run their course and to

conduct an interim evaluation, say after the pilot had been running

for three months. This evaluation would go beyond just featuring

an effectiveness rating to also include many of the items found in

the OptiCom survey (Figure 12.2). This interim evaluation may also

uncover some ways to increase the effectiveness of coaching and

suggest some midcourse corrections.