Increased as Coaching Relationships Evolved

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Coaching That Counts is coaching that impacts the organization in

addition to the individual. Examples of business impact that were

explored in personal interviews with coaching clients included productivity,

team productivity, revenue, employee retention, cost

reduction, and work quality. During these interviews, which lasted

about half an hour, coaching clients were interviewed, and they

reported on which particular business areas they believe were

impacted. These interviews, and other survey data, provided sufficient

information to characterize the coaching relationship in terms

of the four quadrants of the Leading with Insight model, as discussed

in Finding 2. We learned as we examined this finding that

less than half of the coaching relationships reached Quadrants 3

and 4. This is unfortunate, because as we will learn, these latter two

quadrants produce a higher percentage of business impact.

Figure 14.3 shows the percentage of respondents who reported

their coaching having a significant impact on at least one business

impact area according to the four quadrants. Percentages are given

for each quadrant. So, in the first quadrant, Finding Focus, 58

percent of those respondents whose coaching relationship was characterized

as Finding Focus reported that their coaching impacted a

business area. Of those clients whose coaching relationship also

addressed Quadrant 2, Building Bridges, 78 percent reported business

impact. Of all the clients who Created Alignment (Quadrant

3), 87 percent reported business impact. Every client (100%) who

engaged in Original Action (Quadrant 4) reported impacting at least

one business area. Therefore, the higher the quadrant, the higher the

reported business impact.

Earlier in this chapter, we talked about some of the factors that

may limit coaching from accessing the higher-level quadrants. An

implication suggested by Figure 14.3 is that those who manage

coaching initiatives could look closely at these limiting factors. Overcoming

these limitations would appear to increase the likelihood of

the coaching initiative significantly impacting the business.

Finding 4: Monetary Benefits Produced

from Coaching Increased as Coaching