Coaching That Counts

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 

Leadership coaching is coming of age. From the scores of client

testimonials, examples of real business impact, and the creation of

monetary benefits, it is clear that coaching adds real value for both

individuals who are coached and organizations that sponsor coaching

initiatives. Both individuals and organizations are well-served by

coaching. The success of coaching has attracted attention. This

attention has increased the visibility of coaching as well as the expectations

of senior business leaders for coaching to deliver a substantial

ROI. Coaching has made the transition from a “nice to do” for

leaders to a “need to do” for businesses. This transition is healthy,

but it also carries responsibilities. Coaches need to be comfortable

with the notion that their work will ultimately have to have a tangible

impact on the business. Coaching clients will have to apply

what they have learned to create this tangible impact. Coaching initiative

managers will have to create the environment that supports

this higher level of value creation. And the sponsors of coaching

initiatives will have to take that initial leap of faith that all of these

pieces will come together to create real value in their organizations.

There is no standard roadmap. Each organization and its set of

players will have to find their own way of creating value. The key for

a coaching initiative—or any strategic change initiative, for that

matter—is to firmly link the objectives of coaching to the strategic

goals of the organization. Coaching must count in ways that are

strategically important and that meet the expectations of senior

leadership. By adding monetary benefits and ROI to the vocabulary

of those who are involved in coaching initiatives, we are not reducing

coaching to numbers, but rather translating the magic and

power of coaching into another language: the language of business.

Like with any translation, some information may be lost or

changed. The language of business emphasizes monetary value,

managing costs, and producing a healthy ROI. The evaluation of

coaching that has been conducted to date clearly delivers on these

expectations, but this is only part of the story. Intangible benefits

represent the other part of the story. Monetary benefits and intangible

benefits are like two sides of a coin: both are important. Up

until now, the challenge has been that the story of monetary benefits

has not been fully told. Business leaders have been left with the

impression that intangible benefits represented the limits of what

coaching creates. Coaching That Counts changes this scenario and

changes the equation for coaching in the minds of business leaders.

Coaching is essential in those situations where leaders must be qualitatively

more effective and produce results that are more strategic

in nature. Coaching That Counts opens the door to exploring and

increasing the strategic value of coaching.

The Leading with Insight model clearly demonstrates that

coaching adds value by consistently translating deeper levels of

insight into business results that deliver increasingly greater strategic

value to the business. The relationship between how coaching is

delivered in organizations and the value that organizations realize

follows the same dynamic. All coaching is not the same. If organizations

“go cheap”with poorly trained coaches, fair-weather support

for the coaching initiative, and short coaching cycles, the outcomes

will be transactional in nature and of little, if any, strategic value.

Organizations that invest in quality coaches and coach training,

actively support coaching initiatives and take steps to integrate the

learning from coaching into the fabric of their organizations will

reap the greatest benefits, now, and well into the future. Coaching

holds the potential to transform the clients who receive coaching

The Value Nexus: Organization Value and Individual Values 269

and the organizations in which they work. Realizing that potential

requires understanding and respecting the underlying dynamics of

successful coaching engagements and developing a solid management

and evaluation structure for linking this powerful engine to

the strategic intent of the organization. Coaching counts if you do

the work and make the investments to make it count.