3. Build Evaluation Methodology into the Coaching Initiative

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When Phil and John have a meeting of the minds and agree on goals

to increase the supply of capable and diverse leaders, they must go

to the next step and set objectives for how the coaching initiative

will contribute to these goals. These coaching objectives become

the cornerstone for managing coaching as a value-added initiative.

Achieving the coaching objectives contributes to achieving the

business goal. The evaluation strategy goes one step further and

describes how these objectives will be evaluated. Evaluation is not a

passive process. Developing an evaluation objective is also a test of

how strongly the coaching objective is linked to the business goal. If

this link is weak or not well-articulated, the evaluation objective

cannot be written. This link will then have to be strengthened, and

in the process, the potential business impact of coaching will be

better understood and communicated.

Coaching objectives can include delivering monetary value and

an ROI. A key contribution of Coaching That Counts is the ability

to set monetary objectives for coaching and to document the monetary

value that is delivered. The evaluation strategy outlines how

monetary value will be determined and how the effects of coaching

to produce this value can be isolated from other potential influencing

factors. Factoring in the cost of the coaching initiative to the

accumulated benefits allows the ROI to be calculated. The evaluation

strategy will also look into the sources of the monetary value

to show specifically how the business value is being produced. As we

learned from the story of the consulting company, value can be produced—

and a positive ROI realized—but not produce the kind of

value that leaders expect from coaching. John may have been able

to cite how increased productivity contributed to a positive ROI, but

Phil was less interested in productivity gains and more interested in

increasing the supply of leaders.