Section Two: Managing Coaching Initiatives

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Chapter 7 builds on the value that was realized for the individuals

and looks at how coaching also delivers value to the organization.

One conclusion made is that harnessing the power of coaching to

the strategic requirements of the organization is required to drive

value. Failure to do so leaves a lot of value on the table. The case is

made for the strategic management of coaching initiatives, and this

chapter looks ahead to how subsequent chapters illuminate critical

aspects of this issue.

Chapter 8 covers what is most important to get the coaching

initiative off on the right foot. The coaching initiative must be

grounded in the company culture, integrated with other developmental

activities, and directed to achieve organizational goals. A case

study is reviewed in which a coaching initiative was launched with

little regard for these three important areas. Only after the coaching

had been completed did the HR senior VP understand from the chief

operating officer (COO) what the COO had expected from coaching.

The chapter builds on this experience to highlight the critical

success factors for setting the strategic context for coaching. Reviewing

these critical success factors shows how the HR senior VP could

have done things differently, and as a result, created more value for

the business. The chapter concludes by examining how to design a

coaching initiative for maximum impact on the organization.

In Chapter 9, we go from the worst-case practice of the previous

chapter to best-case practice. Four best practices are examined that

have proven to increase the value of a coaching initiative.We see how

a leader of a coaching initiative establishes and leverages a governance

body to sustain the sponsorship for her initiative. Then we

explore in some detail how an orientation session for coaches and

their prospective leader-clients establishes a firm foundation for the

launch and management of the coaching initiative. An innovative

approach to setting up signposts is deployed so that the overall

progress of the coaching initiative can be tracked and better

managed. A balance is struck between allowing each coaching relationship

to take its course and ensuring that the coaching initiative

drives value to the business. This chapter concludes by showing

the value of building evaluation methodology into the coaching

initiative.

Chapter 10 shifts gears by looking at coaching from the perspective

of a coach. Coaches who wish to work successfully in organizations

must be willing to put on a second hat—that of a consultant.

It is important for people to know when they need to be a coach and

when they need to be a consultant.When a coach dons the consultant

hat, he or she becomes engaged in the organization on a broader

scale. Value to the business, not just the client being coached, must

be considered. Consultants develop strategies to successfully navigate

through organizations and to drive the value of coaching to the

business. This chapter concludes by examining the role of coaching

companies. Coaching companies take on the responsibilities of the

consultant, leaving the coaches to concentrate on coaching, and for

some, this may be an ideal arrangement.