Answering the “Who Do I Want to Be?” Question

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The leadership development program in which Mark was participating

was designed, in part, to direct him toward answering the

“Who do I want to be?” question. Through the assessments and personal

journals, participants were expected to gain insight into their

own makeup and form an intention of how they wanted to develop

their potential. The proverbial rubber hit the road for Mark when

he had to choose how to respond to his boss’s request to fire two

team members. This was one moment in which Mark had to decide

who he wanted to be. These moments happen over and over again,

as we use the grist of our own experiences to reveal our unique

composition.

As clients deepen their ability to draw on deeper levels of insight,

they achieve greater clarity about what is important for them. This

clarity often reveals misalignments between what they come to see

as authentic for themselves and how they choose to conduct the

business of their lives. “Who do you want to be?” is one of the questions

that begins the process of creating alignment between who a

person is and how he chooses to conduct himself in the world, and

what he creates.