The Initiative Must Be Actively Managed in a Way That Respects the Privacy of the Coaching Relationships

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 

Managing a coaching initiative is like doing a high-wire act in the

circus. You must have excellent balance between managing the

coaching initiative and honoring the privacy of the coaching relationships.

One misstep in either direction and you can come crashing

to the floor (or hopefully the safety net). If you do not set a

strategic context for coaching then you cannot reasonably expect

coaching to deliver strategic value. However, if you micromanage

coaching relationships the privacy and integrity of the relationships

may be compromised. Executive coaching is a high visibility activity—

everyone is watching. When the executive coaching initiative

has successfully completed and you make it to the other platform at

the end of the high wire, there may be cheers, or most likely, quiet

recognition that the initiative was effectively managed. How do you

as the initiative manager strike this balance? Chapter 9 speaks to

those who manage coaching initiatives by presenting the best practices

that have been observed during formal evaluations of coaching.

In one case, a manager set up signposts for how coaching would

progress in the organization. The manager then asked each client

and coach to record the date when each signpost was reached. In

this way, the manager tracked the progress of each coaching relationship

without getting into the private content of their work.

Chapter 9 also introduces the role of coaching companies.

Coaching companies work with many different client organizations

and can be an excellent source of best practices. These best practices

are valuable to the client company in that the overall value of coaching

can be improved. Coaching companies also provide a valuable

service to the coaches. They perform the consulting services, such as

client relationship management, contracting, billing, and gaining

extension work, that coaches are unwilling or unable to perform

themselves. Chapter 10 is dedicated to helping coaches sort out how

to be an effective consultant, if they so desire. Earning more coaching

work in an organization requires more—and different—actions

than simply providing great coaching. For coaches who do not wish

to be consultants, coaching companies are waiting in the wings.