That CountsTM

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John and Phil were at a crossroads. John, as the chief learning executive

for this global information technology consulting firm, was

arguing for a company-wide rollout of coaching. Phil was chair of

the partner development committee responsible for developing the

bench strength of leaders for the future. Phil’s experience with

coaching was mixed. Some people really liked it and some people

were left scratching their heads about why they were being coached

and what kind of value they were supposed to get out of coaching.

John pointed to the multitude of voices that supported coaching as

evidence that coaching was a powerful developmental tool for building

leadership. Phil heard those voices and yet, as a key business

leader, his inner voice was asking about the business value of the

coaching experience. John and Phil argued their points and neither

budged. In a sense, both were right. John was right in that many, if

not most, leaders found tremendous value in their coaching experience.

Phil was right in the sense that coaching success seemed hit or

miss, and it was not clear how the individual value leaders gained

translated into business value.