CHAPTER 9 ALTERNATIVE WAYS OF CONSTRUING

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Hitherto, we have been concentrating on single grids, showing how one or

more individuals construe a particular topic, and treating each grid as a

description of construing at a particular point in time. But individuals can

change their minds. How can we best describe what happens when they do?

And if we compare any two individuals, their grids will, of course, be different

from each other. Is there a convenient way of comparing the two?

In the first case, we deal with change, and in the second, with difference; in

both, the focus is on alternative ways of construing. This chapter presents

some simple grid techniques which apply in each case.

Firstly, we address personal change, and how changes in an individual’s

construing can be described neatly and succinctly. These procedures can be

used to understand personal growth and development, whether this occurs as

a result of systematic training, or simply as a consequence of the full,

disorganised richness of ongoing experience. They have an application in

counselling (e.g., Edmonds, 1979; Fonda, 1982; Jankowicz & Cooper, 1982) and

in the personal therapeutic experience (though you will have to look

elsewhere, and pre-eminently in Winter, 1992, if you’re particularly interested

in the clinical field).

9.1 Identifying Personal Changes in Construing . . . . . . . . . . 210

9.2 Identifying Differences Between People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221

9.3 In Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230

Things to Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232

Things to Read. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233

Secondly, we outline one approach to difference in construing, the exchange

grid, whose technical rationale comes from applications in individual change,

but which is particularly useful when we wish to compare grids on the same

topic which have been provided by two or more different individuals.