4.2.3 Dyadic Elicitation

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Two elements are presented and the interviewee is asked to indicate an

important way in which they differ, or an important way in which they are

alike. This approach works well where the basic triadic procedure is too

difficult for the interviewee, as in working with children (Salmon, 1976).

However, if you can use the triadic form, it’s best to do so. There are

suggestions that the dyadic procedure leads to grids which don’t reflect the

full complexity and variety of constructs potentially available if dyadic

elicitation is used as the sole elicitation technique (Caputi & Reddi, 1999).