4.2.8 Supplied Elements

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 

You’ll recall, from Section 3.2.2, that there are several alternative ways of

arriving at a set of elements. One approach (a variant of those described in

Section 3.2.2) is to work with the elements provided by the interviewee, but for

you to supply an additional one or two, to test out a belief of your own about

the interviewee’s construct system. This allows you to compare the ways in

which the interviewee construes these key elements and the elements s/he has

provided.

The most common use of a key element of this kind is the self element.

Literally that: ‘myself’. By asking the interviewee to rate him- or herself on the

constructs, you find out what place his/her personal image or aspirations have

among the other elements being construed. It can be fascinating, as well as

useful to your purposes in eliciting a grid on ‘people I admire’ or ‘the other

students in my class’, to see how the interviewee construes ‘myself’ as one of

the elements in comparison to the others!

You give the interviewee an excellent opportunity to express his or her

aspirations and thoughts about the future when you provide two self elements,

the self and the ideal self. For example, ‘myself as I am now’ and ‘myself as I

would wish to be’.

These self elements needn’t pertain to the individual person’s actual self,

current or ideal. If you’re counselling someone who’s seeking a new job, a grid

in which the elements are possible companies to apply to could usefully

include ‘my own job here and now’ and ‘my ideal job’. A manager choosing

between different strategies as elements could have ‘my department now’ and

‘my department in a year’s time’ as elements.

The ‘ideal’ element is helpful in any situation in which the grid is being used

to help the interviewee make a choice. A set of possible outcomes would be

used to elicit constructs, and ratings of the elements on these constructs

obtained. These would then be compared with ratings of the supplied ‘ideal’

element on the same constructs, with a view to discovering which element

came closest to the ideal. Section 6.1.1 describes the procedure, and Jankowicz

(2001) provides a simple example of the use of the ideal element in a decision

procedure.

There is little contention over the use of supplied elements. Their use doesn’t

raise the same problems for analysis as those we discussed above in dealing

with supplied constructs.