Tombstone inscription Its opposite

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 

‘I died with my boots on’ – (I’d given up on life a while ago)

‘Aw, just when I was beginning to – (I was staggeringly competent from

get the hang of things’ the age of 12)

‘I burnt my candle at both ends, – (My annals are short, simple, mute,

to cast a brighter light’ and inglorious)

Other possible monadic statements listed by Epting et al. (1993) in describing

some of the work of Leitner (who invented this technique) are as follows:

(a) Please describe your conception of God.

(b) Please list your earliest memories.

(c) What have been your most significant (life-turning) events?

(d) Do you have dreams which deal in the same theme? What is it?

Epting’s article is worth looking at in detail if you’re seeking further ways of

identifying constructs, both grid and non-grid based.

4.3.3 Non-Verbal Techniques?

The grid itself, and the other techniques for eliciting constructs described

above, all depend on words. In that sense, they require a reasonably articulate

interviewee. But do you remember the definition of a construct given in

Section 2.1.1?: ‘Constructs are contrasts we devise when dealing with the

world, in order to understand it.’

And, while they’re commonly communicated in words – and we’ve got used

to thinking of constructs as spoken or written pairs of single words, or phrases

– it’s the actual distinctions a person recognises and makes that are the

constructs, and not the words in which these distinctions are expressed.

Constructs in themselves are non-verbal.

Try me out. Do constructs exist before the words in which they’re expressed?

Ask your interviewee to provide a set of objects (the real thing where practical;

otherwise, a photograph of them) to act as elements. Next, ask the interviewee

to group them (into two that are the same and one that is different, or place

them into subgroups, or simply to arrange them) in such a way as to signal

what s/he thinks of them – what s/he wishes to ‘say’ about the objects, nonverbally,

as clearly as possible.

For example, the objects may be photographs of paintings a person has seen.

(Or pictures on cards, or samples of textured material. You might care to look

up Neimeyer, 1981, if you want to try out the following example for real!) The

photographs might be lined up in order of preference, a smile and a grimace

providing information about which end of the construct applies to which end

of the line of photographs.

(smile) (grimace)