Other Types of Construct

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You may find it helpful to ask the same questions about the relative frequency

and significance in context of the following kinds of construct. You would

identify them quite simply from their content and/or by asking the

interviewee about them.

. affective: those expressing a feeling or emotion

. behavioural: those which describe what the elements do, or the part they

play in some process to which they belong

. evaluative: those through which an opinion or assessment is offered

. attributional: those which incorporate perceived reasons for behaviour

. unremarkable: those which are just so, sui generis, without any great

implications to be drawn from them. I include these as a reminder that grids

may not be dramatic or inferentially rich – they may consist of simple

straightforward descriptions of how and what the interviewee sees.

Don’t overinterpret the constructs in a grid.

Some examples of all of these are given in Table 5.1.

Now try Exercise 5.3 to see what your feel for

different constructs is like.

Standard Classification Schemes

Finally, in this context, I should mention that the categorisation of constructs

provides the most important technique for analysing more than one grid,

being used to indicate how a group, or sample, of people construe some topic

of common interest and, by implication, to say something about how

individual members of the group compare with each other.

There is more on this in Section 7.2.3, where the use of pre-existing standard

classification schemes is outlined. The discussion also covers the development

of your own classification scheme as part of a technique called content

analysis, described in detail in Section 7.2.