John Westermann

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 

Writer

John Westermann’s career has been shaped by a life of detours.

His father, a lawyer who grew up on Manhattan’s

Park Avenue and rose to become Chief Executive Officer of

the defense contractor Hazeltine Corp., had wanted his son

to follow in his footsteps at Columbia University, but John

wanted to attend Princeton University. In the end, he went to

Trinity College in Hartford, where he did not do well. In fact,

he ranked 312 in a class of 314. After his third year, Westermann

simply couldn’t convince his father that it was worthwhile

sending him for a fourth year.

He returned to Long Island, married his high school sweetheart,

and moved into uncharted territory. He became a bartender,

then a security guard, and finally a village cop. “Besides

being a cop, I was the son of a CEO, brother of a lawyer,

brother of a doctor—a really privileged childhood,” Westermann

said. “I sort of failed my way to the police department.”

He never rose beyond the rank of patrolman, even though he

placed first three times in the civil service sergeant’s exam.

He attributes this to the apparent disapproval of Long Island

Republican politicians. “Not getting promoted spurred me to

start writing,” he said. “I was caught in a civil service trap. . . .

I was going to suck it up and stay. Then I began taking notes.”

He started with articles for a Freeport weekly, then The

Blotter, a local police publication. Eventually, he thought about

converting his police experiences into fiction. He schooled

himself by reading how-to books on writing fiction, and after

nine years, 11 rewrites, and countless rejections, sold his first

novel, High Crimes, to Soho Press in 1988.