Presents andMoney Gifts

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As concerns the amount of gifts given and received during the preceding

month, again women appear to give and receive more than men do. In

one month women give an average amount of 3.5 gifts while receiving

2.8 gifts on average. The corresponding figures for men are 2.6 (given)

and 2.2 (received). The majority of our respondents give and receive

gifts, the value of which does not exceed C–

–9. Expensive gifts, though

given, are rather exceptional. To be sure, men give fewer but more expensive

gifts compared with women. On average men have spent almostC–

–27

on gifts during the preceding month, whereas women spent aroundC–

–17.

Althoughmen receive fewer gifts thanwomen, these gifts are more expensive.

The average monetary value of gifts received by men during the preceding

month amounts toC–

–59.4; for women, the value is about half this

amount:C–

–31.4.

More than two-thirds of our respondents have given money gifts to

the church, acquaintances, family, partner, or children, with children,

church, and partners receiving the greatest amounts. With money gifts,

the same pattern shows up as with “normal” gifts: men usually give

fewer gifts, but their monetary value is greater than that of women’s

money gifts (C––61.2 andC–

–49.9, respectively).Again, men appear to receive

fewer gifts but ones of greater value compared with women (C––126.3 and

C–

–107.3, respectively).

A remarkable finding for which no easy interpretation is at hand is that

the monetary value of gifts received (both monetary and nonmonetary)

is higher than the value of the gifts given; this seems to contradict the

outcome that the number of gifts received is smaller than the number

of gifts given. Are we inclined to forget or underestimate what we spend

on gifts ourselves, or do we overestimate the monetary value of gifts

received? But how would that connect to the smaller number of received

gifts? Unfortunately, on the basis of our research data it is not possible to

answer these questions.An obvious explanation for the fact thatwomen’s

gifts have a lower monetary value compared with men’s gifts is that men

have a higher average income than women so that they have more to

spend.