Supportive Technologies

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In Chapter 10, “The Mobile Workplace: Collaboration in a Vast Setting,”

Daniel Normark & Mattias Esbjörnsson discuss how truly mobile occupational

groups relate to locations in a vast working area when collaborating with

each other. It brings forth two ethnographic studies on mobile professionals

working on the roads. According to the authors of this chapter, their work setting

has predominantly been described from a perspective where they are isolated

in the drivers’ seat. However, seeing that the environment in which they

drive through constitutes their workplace, the chapter examines their relation to

the surroundings when performing their tasks. The empirical data illustrates the

importance of mutual understanding of locations to successfully perform collaborative

tasks. For example, coordinates supplied by a GPS-receiver are not

sufficient in the performance of their tasks. It is rather the mutual understanding

of locations, being in proximity, or other visual clues, which are of importance.

The authors argue the need for a detailed understanding regarding the

use of locations, to succeed in the development of future mobile position-based

services.

In Chapter 11, “Spectator Information Support: Exploring the Context of

Distributed Events,” Andreas Nilsson, Urban Nuldén & Daniel Olsson

argue that, in the context of temporary, distributed events such as music festivals

and sports, the event is divided in several parts held at different geographical

locations at the same time or in a sequence. Thus, the conventional technology

used can only provide limited support at portions of the event. This research

as reported in this chapter focuses on the challenges for design concerning

information support in the context of distributed events. The chapter

reports from three empirical studies and applies two perspectives on context as

a background to the fieldwork findings. Within the results, three main contextual

requirements are presented that need to be considered when designing

information support for spectators in situ. The chapter contributes to existing

research in terms of providing descriptions of the interplay between actors,

context and the event itself. Among the conclusions regarding design, the authors

of this chapter claim that technology should be shaped to behave and act

according to how, where and with whom spectators are situated.

In Chapter 12, “SeamlessTalk: User-Controlled Session Management for

Sustained Car Conversations,” Ola Henfridsson, Mikael Wiberg, Rikard

Lindgren & Fredrik Ljungberg report from a research project focused on

designing a new innovative ICT application to support mobile interaction. More

specifically, the authors of this chapter approach the problem of how to realize

sustained car conversations across mobile phones and in-car phone resources

and, in doing so, they frame it as a session management problem. Addressing

this problem, the chapter outlines a session management model for user-conxv

trolled media switches during ongoing phone conversations. The model makes

a distinction between the user and the infrastructure levels of session management.

To illustrate and validate the rationale of the model, the chapter presents

an in-car mobile phone hands-free system, SeamlessTalk, developed to support

sustained car conversations. The authors argue that their developed user-controlled

session management model contributes to current research on session

management by addressing the explicit/implicit session management dichotomy

in multiple media situations.