Spectator Mobility

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When the spectators arrive at the course, the first thing to do is to find a place

that offers a good visual view of the rally. The start and finish line are the two

main hot spots attracting a large crowd. Those who wish to receive information

from the organizers in situ prefer these two places since loudspeakers keep

them informed. Many spectators find positions throughout the stages to be

more exciting in terms of watching competitors approach at a distance and dart

by at high speeds. As a result they locate themselves at the side of the road (see

Figure 1B).

Figure 1, Location B provides limited access to information updates about the

race, compared to the start and finish line areas. The spectators have to rely on

the radio broadcast while being mobile. During each stage the spectators

continuously wander along the course to alter their position. The excerpt below

illustrates this situation.

Sara at one of the parking lots after the race: I was at the race together

with my dad and he didn’t have a radio, so each time they said

something important, I had to tell him what was going on. This was

also troublesome since you aren’t really always in each other’s

exact proximity. If you aren’t equipped with a radio receiver, you

have no clue on what’s going on. Mostly we were located throughout

the stages, besides the broadcast there wasn’t much information

to go on.

Figure 1. Sketch model describing the distributed spectator locations

from A, the starting point, B, throughout the stage and C, at the finishing

line

This excerpt indicates the importance of field support and the lack of onsite

information sources. Spectators not equipped with mobile support have to rely

on information available through word of mouth from fellow spectators. While

being mobile and away from available announcements it is difficult for the

spectators to access the correct information at the right time.