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Each car’s race time is clocked several times during a stage. The race times are

repeatedly reported in the radio broadcasts with a main focus on the top

competitors. Some of them use the printed program to get an overview of

passing competitors, although it is hard to use in the dark. Some use radio

receivers to listen to the status of the race, or a combination of these two

sources of information. The following excerpt reflects upon the existing

information support.

Catherine at one of special stages: The radio receiver is generally

good, but they seldom mention the overall ratings and times. And

when they do, it’s rather difficult to grasp all of what they are

saying, due to the high pace. Another drawback is when they

broadcast a four minute long interview with a foreign driver; in

that case I prefer the race information only. I think it’s kind of the

wrong way round when you get lots of timestamps on competitors

passing the finish line when you actually are standing at the middle

of the course.

The broadcasts lack a continuous general overview regarding how the race

evolves. Further, reporting journalists have to transfer information to the

listeners almost as fast as the events in the field. Therefore, the pace of the

information transfers varies upon the intensity of the event and arrives at

intervals. The result is that users picking up the broadcast run the risk of losing

important information. The example also shows that the spectator is not fully

satisfied with the content of the broadcast. Still, spectators have no influence

on the broadcasted content, or when it is broadcasted. Several observations

were made of how spectators equipped with radios informed other spectators.

The excerpts also show that the possibility of being updated decreases when

away from the start and finish lines. The radio broadcast, as the only existing

mobile support, cannot address shifting demands of information content. Next,

the study of the Roskilde Festival is described.