Spectator Mobility

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The spectators’ search for suitable locations to watch from depends exclusively

on individual and group preferences on which concert to attend. Many

spectators come in groups and there are different outcomes of their discussions

on which concerts to attend. The result can either be that the group decides to

unanimously attend a specific concert or split up to later reunite again.

Depending on each spectator’s decision, the spectators are scattered over

eight stages (see Figure 2). When the concert ends, the groups reunite at

Figure 2. Sketch over the festival area showing the performance areas

consisting of stages, tents and spectator accommodations at the other end

of the vast field

locations agreed upon. All concerts offer a large standing room for the

spectators, in which a good crowd is drawn.

People have to attend most concerts as early as possible to get a good spot.

Many spectators remain in the accommodation area until the time comes for an

interesting concert. The distance between the performance area and accommodation

is up to a 20-minute walk. As a result, the spectators walk this

distance to attend a concert, and seldom for a spontaneous stroll. During their

stay within the accommodation area they engage in other activities, such as

social interaction with friends and other spectators.

The excerpt below illustrates the relation between spectator mobility and

existing information sources, situated at fixed locations.

Gil standing in line for a terminal: When the concerts are later in the

evening at 10 and lasts until 2 in the morning they follow a tight

schedule. There is a constant flow of spectators between different

stages and performance tents that feature different artists. They

make a lot of changes to the program and the updates seldom

match between the available forums, for instance the program and

announcement boards. The terminals in the area seem pretty well

updated, but it is often long lines to get to use them. Since the area

is so heavily crowded it is hard to reach places where you can get

the latest festival information, for instance the concert schedule.

Walking several hundred meters through a crowd of thousands of

spectators is simply not worth the effort to get hold of it.

The excerpt shows that there are inconsistencies regarding information from the

different sources, which include changes to the festival program. Similarly to the

Rally case, the spectators have much left to wish for when being located away

from existing sources of information. The only information that is fairly fresh is

available at certain locations, provided by interactive terminals and announcement

boards. Since the spectators to a large extent are mobile during the

evening it is often troublesome to reach the locations where information can be

obtained. As a result, it becomes difficult to find sufficient information to make

a schedule for the evening. Moreover, due to inconsistency between different

sources of information it is hard for the spectators to determine the validity of

each source to rely on. The excerpt also indicates that spectators are likely to,

at times, give up the effort of trying to reach locations where information can be

obtained due the crowd of people combined with being remotely situated.