Supplement to the Event

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General event information often becomes of secondary interest. Detailed and

more specific information on the other hand, serves to enhance the event

experience. The Swedish Rally and the Swedish Match Cup are events with an

increased emphasis on competition. From that point of view, event information

complements the understanding of how the event evolves and plays a more

active part of the event experience in comparison to the Roskilde Festival. In

the Roskilde study, event information plays a different role. Most importantly,

the information is used to plan activities of the day. The experience of the festival

consists of the concerts, as well as social interaction with friends (sharing

reactions). These two aspects of the event get intertwined, which results in a lot

of planning and negotiating among the spectators. This is a continuous activity,

which calls for easy and instant access to event information regardless of the

situation at hand or current location.

• Users are often involved in other activities besides listening to information

broadcasts; they seldom exclusively direct their attention to it.

• General event information becomes of secondary interest, while more

detailed, specific information is a supplement that enhances the event

experience.

Spectators are often engaged in the action of the event or interaction with

others, which indicates that the user should initiate the interaction with the

system.

Spectator Mobility

The spectators face different kinds of mobile situations, often varying within a

single event. For example, spectators at the Swedish Rally continuously change

location. Often they walk to a point of the stage where neither visual nor sound

information sources are available. At this location they are able to get close to

the action, but at the same time, their information support gets diminished.

Similarly with Roskilde, spectators experienced on repeated occasions that

there was much left to wish for when it came to festival program updates. This

information also proved to be difficult to get hold of depending on where the

information sources were situated. The Swedish Match Cup study indicates

that spectators tried to maintain some kind of awareness of the highlights of the

event while being mobile and engaged in other activities during the intervals

between races. All three studies indicate the problem of missing information

when spectators are out of range from information sources.

• Spectators’ location varies extensively throughout the course of events, as

opposed to spectators in a conventional arena setting.

• Existing sources of information are situated at fixed locations. Spectators

continuously move around at the event, which results in insufficient

information support while being mobile.