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There exists a significant body of research related to the work reported in this

chapter. First, Trevor et al. (1998), for example, present work on session

management models to enable the representation of a user in a session to be

transferred from one isolated environment to another. Our chapter contributes

to their efforts in that the SeamlessTalk prototype supports not only the transfer

of representations of users, but also the transfer of entire sessions between

different media platforms during car conversations.

Second, the work presented in this chapter also adds more generally to current

research on session management models for supporting ongoing and dynamic

sessions (e.g., Edwards, 1994; Kristoffersen, 1998; Wiberg, 2001b). This

chapter contributes to this research area by presenting a session management

model that acknowledges the importance of supporting media switches during

ongoing conversations in the car context.

Third, there has been a recent trend to move away from traditional and explicit

session management models (see, e.g., Edwards, 1994) towards more implicit

and automatic models (e.g., automatic handover between different radio

stations, mobile ad-hoc networks, etc.). This chapter questions this trend. The

main argument here is that automatic session management might not appear as

seamless to the user. Therefore, this chapter introduces the concept of usercontrolled

service handover to address the issue of how to let the user easily

manage media switches whenever suitable given the situation at hand.

Fourth, Sluis et al. (2001) present an in-house audio system to support freedom

of movement while listening to a continuous audio stream across different

platforms at different locations in a house, i.e., “the uncoupling of devices and

functionality” (Sluis et al., 2001). In their case, platform switches are explicitly

handled with both physical and virtual icons. Expressed differently, they

acknowledge the importance of separating issues related to management of

switches on the user level from technical issues related to the underlying

infrastructure. In the implementation of their system, there are some similarities

with the SeamlessTalk system in that they also leave the switching control to the

user instead of making the switches automatic as the user moves around the

house. However, in their research they neither consider the session management

implications of this approach, nor do they consider how to handle media

switches with a minimum of required user perception.