Design Implications

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As mentioned above, the use of artifacts will be interpreted in places for waiting.

When someone is holding a ticket and looking at it, people will interpret this as

someone checking their ticket, and therefore being a traveler preparing for

traveling. In places for waiting all your visible activities in some way means

interaction with others; people are observed and they are aware of this. This in

turn means that others will interpret any visible use of IT and that this

interpretation is important to the user. From a design perspective it is important

to make the use of artifacts visible and that the usage is displayed to others

present.

However, as discussed above, the impression given is sometimes something

else than the actual activity. This implies that artifacts are used as tools both for

engaging in specific activities but also for communicating a certain activity to

others. In the case of IT design the possibility to “hide” or change the

interpretation of a user’s actual activity should be explored by giving the user

the possibility to use IT-support to alter the interpretations that can be made of

a user’s activity.

• IT should both support engaging in certain activities but also support

communicating a certain activity to others. These two need not be the

same.

Summary of Design Implications

In this subsection the design implications derived from the findings presented

above are summarized.