About the Authors

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Mikael Wiberg is an assistant professor at the Department of Informatics,

Umeå University, Sweden. He is currently director for graduate studies and

chair for the advisors group at the department. He received his Ph.D. in

informatics at Umeå University (2001). The topic for the thesis was design of

mobile CSCW (computer supported cooperative work) systems with a special

focus on design for informal communication and ongoing interaction. In his

current research he is focused on the emerging Interaction Society with related

issues including, e.g., mobile CSCW, mobile meetings, knowledge management

in mobile settings, proximity based interaction, mobile pervasive and

ubiquitous computing, and session management for sustained and dynamic

interaction across physical and virtual arenas. In 2000, he founded the mobile

business research group and currently is leader for the ITL (Interaction Theory

Lab) which he founded in 2002. The research at ITL typically includes

empirical user studies (e.g., ethnographic studies and naturalistic studies),

theoretical work, and design and evaluations of prototype systems. He is also

project manager for an EU-funded research project called Meetings where he

is doing research on design of novel IT-support for co-located social interaction.

Dr. Wiberg has published several articles and presented several papers

about design of mobile, pervasive and ubiquitous IT use in international journals

and conferences.

* * * * *

Eileen Day is a communication professional interested in exploring the multiple

ways that CMC (computer-mediated communication) technologies influence

the interpersonal interactions of people who work together. As a social

researcher, Day also seeks further understandings of the challenges associated

with constructivist methodologies of qualitative research. Her research work

has been published in a variety of forums. Currently, she runs her own small

business, E-Wordscapes Consulting, through which she provides advice on

organizational communication matters. She is also a part-time academic at

RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, teaching within both the School of

Management and the School of Applied Communication.

Mattias Esbjörnsson is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Informatics at

Göteborg University, Sweden. Currently he works at the Mobility Studio,

Interactive Institute (Stockholm). His research focuses on mobile collaboration

in a road setting. The empirical fieldwork displays the requirements, and

possibilities, for road users to communicate with others. Based on the findings

from the empirical fieldwork, prototype services are introduced and evaluated.

The findings from each case are results in their own, providing insight on

different types of collaborative practice among road users. However, the

results are also drawn together to illustrate the possibilities for developing

mobile services supporting collaboration in traffic.

Said Graiouid is professor of communication and cultural studies at University

Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco, and adjunct faculty in the communication

program, Al Akhawayn University, Ifrane, Morocco. He is also an associate

research fellow with the Smart Lab Centre at Central Saint Martins College of

Art and Design, London Institute. He has written extensively on Moroccan

media and cultural politics and is currently co-editing a book on spaces of

communication and culture in Morocco.

Sukeshini A. Grandhi (M.S., M.B.A.) is a Ph.D. student at the Information

Systems Department, New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA. With United

States National Science Foundation sponsorship, she is currently exploring

social and technical issues associated with the use of “place” in interactive

location-based systems.

Ola Henfridsson is the manager of the Telematics Group at the Viktoria

Institute, Göteborg, Sweden. Dr. Henfridsson is also assistant professor in

informatics at the School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical

Engineering, Halmstad University. He holds a Ph.D. in informatics from Umeå

University, Sweden, and is a member of the editorial board of the Scandinavian

Journal of Information Systems. He has published his research in

journals such as Accounting, Management & Information Technologies,

Database, The Information Systems Journal, The Journal of Information

& Knowledge Management, and The Scandinavian Journal of Information

Systems.

Jonny Holmström is an assistant professor in informatics at the University of

Umeå, Sweden, and a research manager in the Center of Digital Business. His

research interests include IT’s organizational consequences and electronic

commerce. He has published his research in Information and Organization,

Information Technology and People, Journal of Global Information

Technology Management, Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems,

and at major international conferences.

Kalle Jegers is a Ph. D. student at the Department of Informatics, Umeå

University, Sweden. He has a background in cognitive science and informatics

and his research focuses around issues of human-computer interaction considering

usability evaluation methodologies and entertainment focused applications.

Quentin (Gad) Jones (Ph.D., University of Haifa, Israel) is an assistant

professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA. Prior to his current

position, Jones was a researcher in the HCI Group of AT&T Labs Research,

New Jersey. Jones’s research focus is on understanding the relationship

between interaction ecologies (virtual or physical) and thriving virtual communities.

Current projects include ContactMap and GeoMemory.

Masao Kakihara is an assistant professor at the School of Business Administration,

Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan. He holds a B.Econ. from Kwansei

Gakuin University, Japan, and both an M.Sc. and Ph.D. from LSE (information

systems). Prior to his graduate and postgraduate studies, he worked for four

years as a corporate strategy consultant in Japan. His research concerns the

emerging working practices of IT-enabled mobile professionals in Tokyo.

Lina Larsson is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Communication,

Linkoping University, Sweden. She studies anaesthesiologists, and focuses

upon their workplace communication and how they coordinate their tasks with

the work of others and the workings of medical technology.

Rikard Lindgren is assistant professor in informatics at School of Economics

and Commercial Law, Göteborg University, and at the School of Information

Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering, Halmstad University. He is also

a member of the Telematics Group, Viktoria Institute, Göteborg, Sweden. He

holds a Ph.D. in informatics from Göteborg University, Sweden. Dr. Lindgren

has published his research in publication outlets such as The European

Journal of Information Systems, The Journal of Information & Knowledge

Management, The Journal of Knowledge Management Practice, and

The Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems.

Fredrik Ljungberg works as a consultant at the R&D company, Newmad

Technologies, and holds a position as professor in “application development”

at the IT University of Goöteborg, Sweden. He has mainly conducted R&D in

mobility and CSCW.

Johan Lundin is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Informatics, Göteborg

University, Sweden. He lectures in the design of mobile information technology

and IT support for learning. His research interests focus on workplace

activities, the ways which practitioners learn how to carry out these activities

and how IT can be designed to support this process.

Andreas Nilsson is a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Informatics,

Göteborg University, Sweden. He lectures in the design of mobile information

technology. His research interests focus on the interplay between spectators

and large events, the ways in which spectators interact with information and

other people in situ, and how technology can be designed to support spectator

practices.

Daniel Normark is a Ph.D. student at the Section for Science and Technology

Studies, Göteborg University, Sweden. Currently he works at the Mobility

Studio, Interactive Institute, Stockholm, and at the section for Science and

Technology Studies in Gothenburg. His research focuses on the daily practices

of road use and how various technologies are interwoven into these activities.

More specific, it is the interaction between roadside habitants and road users

that his research takes an extra interest in by employing ethnographic and other

qualitative methodologies.

Urban Nuldén is an associate professor in informatics at the Department of

Informatics, Göteborg University, Sweden. His research interests include

mobility in various contexts. He is conducting research with the Swedish police

on mobility of police officers. Urban’s research has been published in international

journals and conferences.

Daniel Olsson is a Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Informatics,

Göteborg University, Sweden. He specializes in mobile informatics and media

convergence and combines his research with assignments for Yojimbo AB.

Carljohan Orre is a Ph.D. student affiliated to the Department of Informatics

at Umeå University, Sweden. His research is mainly directed towards ICT

support in the mobile workplace, and he is currently engaged in studies of

mobile information systems in homecare work, and design and development of

mobile learner support systems for companies and education.

Carsten Sørensen is a senior lecturer in information systems and course tutor

for the ADMIS M.Sc. programme at The London School of Economics and

Political Science, UK. He holds a B.Sc. in mathematics, an M.Sc. in computer

science and a Ph.D. in information systems from Aalborg University, Denmark.

His research investigates how ICT shapes and is shaped by working practices,

most recently mobile and wireless technologies. Core concerns in his research

has been the management of social interaction in distributed settings, in

particular considering the increased mobilisation of interaction and the subsequent

struggle for mobile individuals to engage in fluid interaction. Dr. Sørensen

has through the past 14 years been affiliated with a number of Danish, Swedish

and British institutions. In 2002, Dr. Sørensen initiated a research network in

mobile interaction called mobility@lse (http://mobility.is.lse.ac.uk/), which

aims at drawing together academics and practitioners with an interest in

studying the profound changes to society, individuals and technologies in the

mobile society of the 21st century. He has, since 1997, been research director

of Laboratorium for Interaction Technology (http://laboratorium.htu.se) at

Trollhättan Uddevalla University, Sweden, which is actively engaged in large

regional development projects funded by the European Union, Swedish

funding agencies and local industries and public organisations. To contact him:

Department for Information Systems, London School of Economics and

Political Science, Tower 1, Houghton Street WC2A 2AE, London, United

Kingdom; c.sorensen@lse.ac.uk; http://is.lse.ac.uk/staff/sorensen/

Richard J. Varey, Professor of Marketing, The Waikato Management

School, New Zealand, has extensively inquired on systems of managed human

interaction, and has written widely on corporate communication, marketing

communication, and information systems. He co-edited Internal Marketing:

Directions for Management (Routledge, 2000), and authored Marketing

Communication: Principles and Practice (Routledge, 2002) and Relationship

Marketing: Dialogue and Networks in the E-commerce Era (Wiley,

2002).

Charlotte Wiberg, Ph.D., is a researcher and project manager at the

Department of Informatics, Umeå University, Sweden. Her work focuses on

but is not limited to human computer interaction, usability and usability

evaluation methodologies, with a special interest in evaluation of entertainment

on the Web.