Conclusions

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In this paper we have presented an initial study with the main purpose to find

design guidelines for edutainment games. After the evaluation process, where

expert walkthroughs as well as empirical usability evaluations were conducted,

focus group sessions with HCI experts and game designers were performed.

This resulted in a list of guidelines. These guidelines included: (1) Earning and

loosing points, (2) Scoring and performance feedback, (3) Differences in

valuable objects, (4) Task performance and feedback, (5) Promoting exploration,

(6) Game objects’ characteristics, (7) Real world inheritance, (8)Understandable

menus, (9) Supporting tools and their layout and, finally, (10)

Game instructions.

Issues for future research includes further testing of other types of edutainment

games in order to further verify the generality of the above developed design

guidelines for edutainment games.

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