Part II: Theories Making Sense of Technology-Enabled Interaction

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This second part of this book, entitled “Theories,” takes on a theoretical perspective

on the Interaction Society. In this section, the contributing authors bring

forward various discussions concerning the basic and fundamental concepts of

the Interaction Society including, e.g., “interaction,” “communication,” “collaboration,”

and “coordination.” The contributing chapters in this second section

also contain models and theories developed to help us to better understand,

analyze and even predict the role and impact of modern information and communication

technologies on us as individuals, social groups, organizations and on

our society. Further on, this second part of the book provides us with some models

for analyzing current efforts made to support both online interaction and interaction

using mobile devices in ad-hoc networks.

Overall, the purpose of this third section is thus to provide us with some analytical

tools in order to help us better understand computer-supported, and mediated,

interaction. If we are to deal with a new society, which is right now in the making,

it is important to have the analytical tools to help us see what is important and what

is not, what is unique and what is not, what is highly dynamic and what is stable,

and at least, but maybe foremost, enable us to identify what is affected, or changed

by, through, in, and via this new technology and technology use.

Informational and Communicational Explanations of Corporations 139