RECOVERY

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Meet with the customer, and use the content listing above as a guide for your

meeting. Ensure that every item is covered. Go through each paragraph of the

TEAMFLY

SOW that is or might be in question. Come to an understanding with the customer

as to exactly what the customer wants. Come to an understanding with

the customer on how recovery can be made. This includes:

Schedule Recovery

Financial Recovery

Technical Recovery

Document all the understandings. It may be advisable to reverse contract

(see glossary) the customer and, when approved, include those understandings

in the requirements document (contract) as an official change. Be careful—

some customers take a dim view of this action.

One way to ensure that this does not happen again is to have the project

manager and the technical manager on the proposal team and the negotiation

team. Then, if it happens again, maybe you need a new project manager!

Additional Resources:

MIL-STD-245

1d (NO) The SOW was not properly negotiated.

Very simply, a poorly negotiated SOW is one in which there is either a misunderstanding

of the task or a lack of balance between the scope of work to be

accomplished, the amount of money to be paid, and the time allowed to complete

the task. Usually, the performer of the work is concerned only if the scope

of work exceeds the budget or the schedule. But the other side of the equation

should also be true. Every negotiation should be a win-win negotiation. Otherwise,

the aggrieved party will attempt to ‘‘get even.’’