RECOVERY

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 

Determine what the customer really wants. Discovery of this kind of situation

probably means you bid the requirement(s) incorrectly and could be in for

a lot of headaches. Further, you need to know why the requirements definition

(negotiating) team made the interpretation they did so it won’t happen again.

If you have a good negotiator and a reasonable customer, you may be able to

adjust the requirement to incorporate the new interpretation as added scope. If

not, you’ll have to absorb the costs. Use the following process:

Meet with the customer.

Go through each paragraph of the Specification that is or might be in

question (I really recommend that you don’t skip any).

Come to an understanding with the customer as to exactly what is wanted.

Come to an understanding with the customer on how recovery can be

made. This includes:

• Schedule Recovery

• Financial Recovery

• Technical Recovery

One way to ensure this does not happen again is to have the project manager

and the technical manager on the proposal team and the requirements definition

(negotiation) team. If it happens again, maybe you need a new project

manager.

Additional Resources:

MIL-STD-245

2d (NO) The Specification was not properly negotiated.

If the Specification was not properly negotiated, you may or may not have

an opportunity to renegotiate. If you do not have an opportunity to renegotiate,

you are likely looking into an overrun. A Specification is not properly negotiated

if there is a difference of opinion between the customer and the contractor as

to the meaning or content of any element of the Specification.