RECOVERY

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If you do not have a CMP, consider the following outline. The detail of what

should be contained in each section can be found in Attachment 5. Modify the

outline as necessary for your purposes:

1. Introduction

2. Reference documents

3. Organization

4. Configuration management phasing and milestones

5. Data management

6. Configuration identification

7. Interface management

8. Configuration control

9. Configuration status accounting

10. Configuration audits

11. Subcontractor/vendor control

Configuration Management should be treated on at least at two levels. The

generally accepted levels are, appropriately enough, Class I and Class II. Class I

changes are those that affect form, fit, or function while Class II changes are

those that affect only documentation. Class I changes require convening a full

Configuration Management (or Control) Board, often called the CCB. Class II

changes only require the concurrence of the head of the CCB.

The Configuration Management Plan should be prepared for specific project

use and generally follow the requirements of MIL-STD-973, MIL-STD-483,

MIL-STD-61, EIA-649, or ISO 10007, as determined by the requirements document

(contract).

The purpose of the Software Configuration Management (SCM) plan is to

achieve the ‘‘Repeatable’’ level on the Software Engineering Institute’s (SEI’s)

Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and meeting the ISO/IEC 12207/MIL-STD-

498 and the additional MIL-STD-973 requirements.

Additional Resources:

The following may contribute to developing your plan:

Data Item Descriptions (DIDs)

DI-CMAN-81343

DI-CMAN-80858A

61b (NO) Change requests were not presented and approved by an

appropriate level of the Review Board.

Change requests were not presented and approved by an appropriate level

of the Review Board when the presentations and approvals did not follow the

Configuration Management Plan (CMP).

RECOVERY

You should have a CMP (See Attachment 5) containing a Configuration

Control Section. A Change Process should be part of the Configuration Control

Section.

Additional Resources:

The following may contribute to developing your plan:

Data Item Descriptions (DIDs):

DI-CMAN-81343

DI-CMAN-80858A

Standards:

MIL-STD-973

MIL-STD-483

MIL-STD-61

EIA-649

ISO 10007

ISO/IEC 12207

MIL-STD-498

61c (NO) Version controls are not in place and are not reflected on

(in) the product.

Version controls are not in place and are not reflected on (in) the product

when the affected product is not appropriately marked with the version which

describes it in the Version Description Document (VDD) (see glossary) and to

which it has not been tested.