7.2 Ordering Techniques

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Ordering techniques are needed to make sense of the mound of data you have

created by brainstorming, researching processes, and reviewing ‘‘Best Practices.’’

There are many, many ordering techniques available but I have chosen only a

few (see Table 7-1). These few have either a primary and secondary purpose or

lead directly to a secondary purpose. For example, the 85:15 Rule not only

orders data but also places it into two primary categories. Cause and Effect

Diagrams not only lay out the causes and reasons for the causes but provide a

trail of sorts to the effect. Furthermore, the Cause and Effect Diagram leads

directly to Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). (You may or may not

want to use FMEA depending on the issue with which you are dealing. It is

more appropriate to technical issues than programmatic issues.)

T a b l e 7 - 1 — O r d e r i n g T e c h n i q u e s

Ordering Technique Purpose

85:15 Rule To organize information into ‘‘process’’ or ‘‘people’’ categories.

Cause and Effect Diagrams To show the relationship of reasons to causes and causes to effects

Affinity Diagrams To organize large groups of information into meaningful categories

Relationship Diagrams To show the relationship(s) between elements