7.3 Interrelationships of Causes

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Many causes will have interrelationships with other causes. That’s not necessarily

bad but what you must look for is duplication and overlapping. Duplication

is a waste of time and money. Overlapping causes will tend to present an unclear

picture of what the problem really is when you try to classify the problem.

When you have reached a stopping point or believe you have reached a

plateau in your search and organization of causes and potential causes, step

back for a moment and review what you have created, and take an objective

view of your new cause package. If you have not reached Shangri-la, don’t

worry. Tomorrow is another day.

If you have solved the immediate problem, that’s wonderful. If you are performing

this process before you have a problem, congratulations. What you

want to do now that you have a feel for the overall process is to look back at

your business area standards, your customer references, and your enterprise

policies and processes and make certain your new Search Table and Cause Descriptions

reflect all these standards.