10.4 Modifying Methods

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Well, just how do you modify the information in (and not yet in) your database?

The techniques will vary according to who is responsible for the data in the first

place.

Project data as it applies to your project, there should be no problem at all.

After all, it is you who are responsible for this data, and you have control of

your Program and Technical Plans and all the other data generated by your

project. As Nike says: ‘‘Just do it!’’

Project data that will be applicable to other projects should be a part of the

enterprise database. That data should be routed through the ‘‘Senior Advisory

Council’’ or whoever else is responsible for commonizing and approving data

to be used by all projects and incorporated into the database.

Corporate, company, or enterprise data that will be applicable to the entire

enterprise should be a part of the enterprise database. That data should be

routed through the ‘‘Senior Advisory Council’’ or whoever else is responsible

for commonizing and approving data to be used by all projects. It should be

clear at this point why an enterprise needs a ‘‘Senior Advisory Council.’’

Customer data takes a different route. Either the contracts manager or a

senior enterprise executive should draft correspondence to the customer suggesting

the change to the customer documentation and provide substantiating

documentation as to why this needs to be done. This is a diplomatic issue and

should be handled by someone in the organization capable of handling diplomatic

correspondence. Incorrect handling of this issue could end up with a

situation that could create far more harm than good.

Standard documentation, such at that written by a standards group, must be

handled by an expert qualified to speak on the subject. After all, the standards

group had a committee of experts that created that standards data—after much

research and argument—in the first place. Be sure to substantiate your position

clearly and thoroughly. Be absolutely certain that you are correct and have your

correspondence drafted by an expert and cosigned by a senior enterprise executive.

When everyone is satisfied, send your correspondence to the standards

organization.