Rating the Pyramided Constructs in the Grid

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Since your aim in using pyramiding is variety, you rate all of the constructs

this procedure has provided (as opposed to the single construct which is the

end of the laddering-down procedure described earlier). Write each construct

which results from the pyramiding procedure on the grid sheet, and ask your

interviewee to provide ratings of all the elements on each.

Pyramiding is something you do for a reason, often one relating to the overall

design of the investigation in which grids are to be used. So the way in which

the ratings of pyramided constructs are recorded and analysed will, in fact, be

determined by that design.

Please carry out Exercise 4.2 before going on.

In conclusion, if you’re reading this guidebook in conjunction with Fransella

et al. (2004), please note that those authors make no distinction between

laddering down and pyramiding. They use the two terms as synonyms for the

procedure I have just described in Section 4.4.1, ‘pyramiding’. There is,

however, a distinction between the two, both procedurally (see Kelly, 1963:

57–58) and with respect to the theory of self-reference (see Jankowicz, 2000b),

and I have retained it here as one which I believe to be useful, particularly

when you’re coming to grips with construct elicitation for the first time.