THINGS TO DO

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Exercise 4.1 Handling the Interview

By way of feedback on your use of basic grid technique and to provide you

with a self-check on how much of the above you have found helpful, please

read Appendix 2. This is part of a transcript of a grid interview, which starts as

the first construct is being elicited. Please don’t look at Appendix 1.2 for the

feedback yet.

Go through the transcript and see how many of the procedural issues dealt

with by the questions in Sections 4.1.1–4.1.3 arise in the transcript. Take a sheet

of paper and, working through the pages of Appendix 2, write down:

(a) the page number in Appendix 2

(b) whether one of the procedural issues occurs on that page

(c) which one it is. (You’ll notice that each procedural issue in Sections 4.1.1–

4.1.3 has been numbered for just this purpose. No expense has been

spared.)

(d) how the issue was handled, refreshing your memory about the principles

involved, in Sections 4.1.1–4.1.3.

When you’ve finished, check your answers in

Appendix 1.2.

Exercise 4.2 Practising Pyramiding

Read over Section 4.4.2 before you begin.

(a) Go back to the grid you did in Exercise 3.2.

(b) Ask which construct your interviewee feels is the most important to him or

her. This should be one which, your interviewee feels, ‘stands for a lot of

things’. Call this construct X.

(c) Then ask your interviewee which is the least important, one which is ‘just

so’, without standing for a lot of other things that need expressing. Call

this construct Y.

(d) Now carry out the pyramiding technique on construct X. How many

different subordinate constructs come to mind? Try for at least four.

(e) Now do this with construct Y. Aim for at least two subordinate constructs.

Are there more?

Consider two questions.

Was it, in fact, easier to pyramid lots of constructs for a construct that is

important to your interviewee, and fewer for a construct that isn’t particularly

important?

Looking at the two sets of constructs, how would you characterise them? I’m

asking you not to consult with your interviewee, but to make a judgement

yourself. Are they of any particular kind? Do they differ systematically

between construct X and construct Y?

Now check Appendix 1.3.

THINGS TO READ

At this point, you might want to go over either of Kelly’s two books. The most

useful at this point is his summary of basic personal construct theory:

. Kelly, G.A. (1963) A Theory of Personality: The Psychology of Personal

Constructs. London: Norton.

Alternatively, if you’re not ready for Kellian theory but want to know a little

about the use of the grid as a simple decision-making procedure, and gain

some insights into the use of grids for making tacit knowledge explicit, why

not glance at

. Jankowicz, A.D. (2001) ‘Why does subjectivity makes us nervous? Making

the tacit explicit’. Journal of Intellectual Capital 2, 61–73.

But that’s scarcely essential, and at this stage, if it’s a question of a choice

between exercises or reading, I’d much rather you completed Exercises 4.1 and

4.2.