SIMPLE AVAILABILITY: TO MANAGERS IN PARTICULAR

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To focus on the other, and broader, audience for this guidebook, the managers

and practitioners. Forget all that about epistemologies. From your point of

view in particular, there simply hasn’t been a simple practical guidebook to

offer you for many years, ever since the Stewarts’ Business Applications of

Repertory Grid, published in 1982, went out of print. There have been many

books outlining the basic theory, and one or two on the technique itself, but

none have gone into the kind of practical, procedural detail which a user,

bereft of a decent introduction in the psychology departments or isolated as a

practitioner, needs to see if s/he is to become comfortably proficient in

repertory grid technique.

The second edition of the Manual of Repertory Grid Technique by Fransella, Bell

& Bannister will appear in 2004 (also published by Wiley). That gives a more

detailed and in-depth coverage of repertory grids, as did the first edition

(1977) by Fransella & Bannister, which has been out of print for several years.

This guidebook has been seen in its entirety by the senior author, who has

shared details of the planned contents of the Manual with me, all within the

constraints of our respective publication schedules.

Between the two, it may be possible to ameliorate, if not reverse, the neglect of

this technique in the universities, and in the meanwhile provide the user with

a solid foundation for practice.

It remains to thank my kind collaborators. Fay Fransella has already been

mentioned; her spirit resides in the comments made by the ‘second voice’ of

this book, though the responsibility for its embodiment in print is, of course,

my own. Tom Ravenette provided examples of early forms of grid analysis

and much moral support! Thanks, too, to Ms Marianna Pexton of the

Analytical Services Division of the Department of Social Security (DSS), now

Department of Work and Pensions (DWP), for facilitating departmental

permission to reproduce Table 7.1. My special thanks go to my colleagues and

students, who have seen earlier drafts of this guide and contributed their

valuable comments and ideas.

Devi Jankowicz

Professor of Constructivist Managerial Psychology

Graduate Business School

University of Luton

February 2003