THINGS TO READ

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 

Now that you have a good feel for the repertory grid, how it’s elicited, and

how to appreciate, in some depth, the meanings it conveys, it might be a good

point to take in a little more theory. I suggest that the most valuable activity at

this stage would be to go outside the field of personal construct psychology,

and read what some other people of a constructivist inclination have to say

about how people construe and, in particular, how they come to share

constructions of their experience.

. Berger, P.L. & Luckmann, T. (1976) The Social Nature of Reality. Harmondsworth:

Penguin.

One field in which process analysis is important is personal counselling and

guidance. The following is directly relevant as an example of professional

practice.

. Jankowicz, A.D. & Cooper, K. (1982) ‘The use of focused repertory grids in

counselling’. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 10, 136–150.

It would also serve to show how approaches from personal construct

psychology are relevant to the process work done by OD consultants and

anyone taking an action learning approach to organisation development.