Identifying Key Positions and Talent Requirements for the Future

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Neither key positions nor their work requirements will remain forever static.

The reason, of course, is that organizations are constantly in flux in response

to pressures exerted internally and externally. As a result, SP&M coordinators

need to identify future key positions and determine future work requirements

if they are to be successful in preparing individuals to assume key positions.

They must, in a sense, cope with a moving-target effect in which work requirements,

key positions, and even high-potential employees are changing.2

But how can they be certain what positions will be key to the organization

in the future? Unfortunately, the unsettling fact is that no foolproof way exists

to predict key positions. About the best that can be done is to conduct careful

reviews of changes in work and people, and draw some conclusions about the

likely consequences of change.