Phase I: Preparation

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 
204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 

Senior managers must prepare for their meeting. A major value-added that can

be provided by the HR department is to hold meetings with each senior manager

before the meeting with the CEO or their peers to discuss what they will

say and how they will say it. The reason to do that is that managers have a

tendency to focus on ‘‘what is wrong.’’ That management-by-exception philosophy,

while possibly desirable in other areas of management by economizing

the time spent, can be devastating to the reputations of successors. The point

is that public meetings to discuss development with the CEO or with peers

should focus on ‘‘what we are going to do and what we want the outcomes to

be’’ rather than ‘‘what is wrong’’ with someone. HR professionals can work

through the problems that lead up to various developmental actions. In that

way, public meetings can focus on actions to be taken and the desired results—

and not on what is ‘‘wrong’’ with someone.