Summary

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 
204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 

This chapter addressed three simple questions: (1) What is evaluation? (2)

What should be evaluated in succession planning and management? and (3)

How should a succession planning and management program be evaluated?

Evaluation was defined as the process of placing value or determining worth.

It is through evaluation that the need for improvements is identified and such

improvements are eventually made to the succession planning and management

program. Evaluation should focus on several key questions: (1) Who will

use the results? (2) How will the results be used? (3) What do the program’s

clients expect from it? and (4) Who is carrying out the evaluation?

The evaluation of succession planning and management was focused on

four levels, comparable to those devised by Donald Kirkpatrick to describe

training evaluation. Those four levels are customer satisfaction, program progress,

effective placements, and organizational results. One conducts evaluation

anecdotally, periodically, or programmatically. Anecdotal evaluation is akin to

using testimonials in evaluating training. Periodic evaluation examines isolated

components of the succession planning and management program at different

times, focusing attention on program operations at present or in the recent

past. Programmatic evaluation examines the succession planning and management

program comprehensively against its stated mission, objectives, and activities.