PREFACE TO THE THIRD EDITION

К оглавлению
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 
34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 
51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 
68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 
85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 
102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 
119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 
136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 
153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 
170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 
187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 
204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 

A colleague told me over the phone the other day that ‘‘there have been no

new developments in succession planning for decades.’’ My response was,

‘‘Au contraire. There have been many changes. Perhaps you are simply not

conversant with how the playing field has changed.’’ I pointed out to him that,

since the second edition of this book was published, there have been many

changes in the world and in succession planning. Allow me a moment to list a

few:

Changes in the World

The Aftereffects of 9/11. When the World Trade Center was destroyed,

172 corporate vice presidents lost their lives. That tragic event reinforced the

message, earlier foreshadowed by the tragic loss of life in Oklahoma City, that

life is fragile and talent at all levels is increasingly at risk in a world where

disaster can strike unexpectedly. In a move that would have been unthinkable

ten years ago, some organizations are examining their bench strength in locations

other than their headquarters in New York City, Washington, or other

cities that might be prone to attack if terrorists should wipe out a whole city

through use of a dirty nuclear weapon or other chemical or biological agent.

Could the organization pick up the pieces and continue functioning without

headquarters? That awful, but necessary, question is on the minds of some

corporate and government leaders today. (In fact, one client of mine has set a

goal of making a European capital the alternative corporate headquarters, with

a view toward having headquarters completely re-established in Europe within

24 hours of the total loss of the New York City headquarters, if disaster should

strike.)

The Aftereffects of Many Corporate Scandals. Ethics, morality, and values

have never been more prominent than they are today. In the wake of

the scandals affecting Enron, Global Crossing, WorldCom, and many other

corporations—and the incredible departure of Arthur Andersen from the corporate

world—many leaders have recognized that ethics, morality, and values

do matter. Corporate boards have gotten more involved in succession plan-

ning and management owing, in part, to the requirements of the Sarbanes-

Oxley Act. And corporate leaders, thinking about succession, realize that future

leaders must model the behaviors they want others to exhibit and must avoid

practices that give even the mere appearance of impropriety.

Growing Recognition of the Aging Workforce. Everyone is now talking

about the demographic changes sweeping the working world in the United

States and in the other nations of the G-8. Some organizations have already

felt the effects of talent loss resulting from retirements of experienced workers.

Growing Awareness that Succession Issues Amount to More Than Finding

Replacements. When experienced people leave organizations, they take

with them not only the capacity to do the work but also the accumulated

wisdom they have acquired. That happens at all levels and in all functional

areas. Succession involves more than merely planning for replacements at the

top. It also involves thinking through what to do when the most experienced

people at all levels depart—and take valuable institutional memory with them.