How Are Values Used in Succession Planning and Management?

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Values statements and values clarification, like competency models, are essential

building blocks on which to base a succession planning and management

effort. Without them, it is difficult to add an ethical dimension to the development

of people in various departments, job categories, or occupations. Much

like competency models, they help to do the following:

Link and align the organization’s core values to group and individual

values.

Define high potentials or other broad categories of employees.

Clarify exactly what present and future values are essential to success in

the organization and in its various departments, jobs, or occupations.

Provide a basis for performance management by creating a work environment

that encourages value-based performance.

Establish the values underlying work expectations for the present and

future.

Create full-circle, multirater assessments that are tailor-made to the

unique requirements of one corporate culture.

Provide another basis to formulate individual development plans (IDPs)

to help individuals develop themselves to meet present and future challenges.

Conducting Values Clarification Studies

Many tools and techniques are available to help organizations clarify their values.

Some organizations undertake values clarification through small group

activities.16 Others use unique approaches, such as teaching championship automobile

racing.17 At least two other approaches may be used. One is simple;

the other is more complicated—but may be more meaningful.