What Employees Can Do to Be More Valued and Better Recognized

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There may be good reason why some employees don’t feel valued or recognized—

perhaps they have not made themselves as valuable to the business

as they think they have. Research has consistently shown that the vast

majority of employees feel underpaid and believe they are in the top 25

percent of all performers, which, of course, cannot be the case. This means

that many employees have an inflated view of their value or that they feel

unduly entitled to receive what they have not earned.

Here then are some guidelines for employees for getting more recognition

and pay:

Ask your manager to define what results are required for excellence

in your job.

Ask yourself if you are willing to work hard and pay the price to

achieve those results.

Ask what criteria are used to determine bonuses and raises.

Ask yourself if you are willing to put more of your pay at risk, to be

paid bonuses based on achieving targeted results rather than getting

annual pay raises.

If so, make them part of your performance plan and commit to

achieving them.

Compete against yourself to achieve key results, not against your

peers.

Ask what new skills would make your more valuable to the organization.

Tell your manager how you prefer to be recognized for your contributions.

Ask to sit in on a sales call with a satisfied customer to better understand

the value of your job.

Present a cost-benefit analysis to your manager making the case for

the purchase of tools and equipment you believe you need.

If you feel you are being kept out of the loop, ask for more information.

Don’t wait for your manager to ask for your input—give him or her

the benefit of your views and ideas.