Engagement Practice _ 5: Allow Team Members to Interview Candidates

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When those who would work with the new hire as teammates are allowed

to take part in the interviewing process without the manager being present

in the room, they are free to answer the candidate’s questions forthrightly.

Likewise, the candidate is likely to feel less inhibited about asking questions

of peers that might be uncomfortable to ask if the boss were present.

This practice has two added advantages: The ‘‘two-heads-are-betterthan-

one’’ factor typically leads to better candidate selection, and it also

creates greater participation and ‘‘buy-in’’ from team members while sending

them the message that their opinions count.

All interviewers need to be told up front that they are expected to

provide solid reasons for voting ‘‘yea’’ or ‘‘nay’’ on a candidate. Some

companies assign each interviewer a specific focus area for their questioning,

such as fitting in, technical skills, business acumen, and so on.