Mismatch

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Many of the obstacles to effective job-person matching are based on deficiencies

of organizational leadership and the human resource department,

while some are attributable to the manager and others to the individual

employee:

The organization does not have basic job descriptions.

The organization is using outdated job descriptions as the basis for

screening, interviewing, and hiring.

The organization has so narrowly defined the activities of a job that

employees who occupy that job feel they have no room to perform

the job in a way that makes best use of their strengths.

The organization has not forecasted critical talent needs based on

clear strategic business objectives.

The organization has not analyzed jobs based on key targeted results

to determine the critical few talents that distinguish top performers

from average performers in each role.

The fast pace of the organization and/or the manager has created a

tendency to rush through the interview process and make hires without

careful evaluations.

Senior leaders have failed to establish a rigorous talent evaluation

process, both for new hires and for current employees, as part of the

career/succession planning process.

Senior leaders and managers have overpromoted the idea of ‘‘selecting

the best’’ instead of ‘‘selecting the best fit,’’ which often results

in the hiring of college graduates with the best grades or from the

best schools who do not always fit the culture or excel in the roles

for which they were chosen.

There has been an excessive focus on eliminating employee weaknesses

through coaching and training when it would be wiser in

many cases to put those employees into new roles where they can

better capitalize on their greatest strengths.

Organizational values, structures, and policies have reinforced the

idea that the only way to grow professionally is to be promoted.

Hires made from a limited talent pool have greatly limited the

chances of finding an acceptable match.

There has been a failure to delegate.

Companies with strong reputations for selecting the right talent and

keeping employees well matched with their jobs do seem to have certain

best practices in common. These practices fall into four main areas: selecting,

engaging through job task assignment, on-going re-engagement as

needed, and job enrichment.